Wildlife Extinction Crisis

dreamstime_m_1890771Our planet Earth is experiencing a wave of mass extinction. Animal and plant species are disappearing at an alarming rate.

Although extinction is a natural phenomenon, it is usually limited to one to five species per year. At the current rate, scientists have estimated that we are losing thousands of species year after year due to human interference.

In the past, most mass extinctions were caused by volcanic eruptions, asteroid strikes, climate shifts or other natural disasters, the present situation is almost entirely caused by humans and is the consequence of changes to the delicate balance of eco-systems, our biosphere and habitats that include rainforests, coral reefs, grasslands, tundra’s, polar regions and local environments.

The loss or extinction of every species has the potential of leading to the extinction of other species interdependent through the ecology of their natural environment and it is clear, that thousands are at risk to disappear forever.

Amphibians such as frogs, toads are disappearing due to the loss of their habitat and water and air pollution. Declining bird populations confirm that many changes are occurring in response to human interference.

Butterflies, earthworms and 30% of the 1.2 million known species of invertebrates are at risk and threatened by water pollution, ground water changes and deforestation. Our rivers and oceans are polluted and many of the fresh water and marine habitats are endangered and at risk of disappearing

Even mammals – our closest relatives – the primates such as monkeys, apes and chimpanzees along with marine mammals such a whales, dolphins and porpoises are severely endangered and are heading towards extinction.

Can our planet be saved – can the human species survive?